ATOI

Dale Adcock

Faig Ahmed

Hurvin Anderson

Scott Anderson

Fabio Lattanzi Antinori

Michael Armitage

Luke Armitstead

Lello // Arnell

Francis Bacon

Cornelia Baltes

Simon Belleau

Joshua Bilton

Alison Blickle

Benjamin Brett

Andrew Brischler

Carla Busuttil

Scott Carter

Jonathan Chapline

James Clarkson

Mikey Cook

Kevin Cooley

Elizabeth Corkery

Øystein Dahlstrøm

Blake Daniels

Fleur Van Dodewaard

Tomory Dodge

Antoine Donzeaud

Zavier Ellis

Amir Fattal

Madeline Von Forerster

Ruth Freeman

Anthony Goicolea

Jonny Green

Pablo Griss

Eckart Hahn

Felicity Hammond

Byzantia Harlow

Neil Harrison

Clinton Hayden

Colleen Heslin

Oliver Hickmet

Aaron Holz

Edward Hopley

Gary Hume

Christoffer Joergensen

Tamara K.E

Olivier Kosta-Thefaine

Olaf Kuhnemann

Bruce LaBruce

Janneke Van Leeuwen

Tomáš Libertíny

Gijs Van Lith

Tom Lovelace

Kate Lyddon

Nigel Massey

Roberto & Renato Miaz

Holly Mills

Jenny Morgan

Ryan Mosley

Benjamin Murphy

Jose Carlos Naranjo

Regina Nieke

Sarah Pager

Selma Parlour

Yelena Popova

Martine Poppe

Tony Romano

Lou Ros

Maja Ruznic

Alan Sastre

Sebastian Schrader

Andrew Sendor

Dominic Shepherd

Pawel Sliwinski

Berndnaut Smilde

Evren Sungur

Shaan Syed

Struan Teague

Alexander Tinei

Kristian Touborg

Luke Turner

Alain Urrutia

Dan Voinea

Mathew Weir

Jack West

Jonathan Zawada

Emma Fineman

Inquire about this work

Details forthcoming...
The Queen Has White Teeth (2019), Oil and Charcoal on Canvas, 213x178cm
Grimaldi (2019) Oil and Charcoal on Canvas, 46x36cm
Two Steps Till Heaven (2018), oil on canvas, 240x180cm
Questions of Silence (2017), oil on canvas, 235x170cm
At Your Bedside (2018), oil and charcoal on canvas, 260x730cm
My Hometown Was Burning and All I Could Think Of Was That Sun Bleached Wall I Pictured in A Dream About The Dominican Republic (2017), oil and charcoal on canvas, 235x235cm
Why Is It So Hard To Stay In Present Time (2018), oil on canvas, 235x150cm

Emma Fineman’s paintings (often oil on canvas) are, quite broadly, pictorial representations of time in contemporary culture. We live in a moment where our perspective of temporality is distorted, with instant mass communication of world events, and the rendering of images and memories within a digital space, creating a kind of cognitive dissonance–being at once near and distant. This inundation affects our ability to place events within existing frameworks of time and perspective. Fineman is interested in this speed of today’s culture, how it affects the genesis of new memories. It is this fractured sense of time (and the way that it is perceived) that Fineman attempts to interpret through gestural marks that, Fineman says: ‘sit somewhere between drawing and painting; between the quick note-to-self one makes in order to jot down an idea, and the more prolonged meditation on the parts of daily life that, for some unknowable reason, affix themselves to the back of one’s mind and kick about with an unnerving permanence.’ Fineman’s works certainly have a sense of both haste and permanence: bold, heavy marks seemingly being applied to the canvas with great speed–set down, perhaps, before the memory fades. In her representations of people, too, the artist renders faces and figures as if they were dwindling visages, a memory of a memory, their solidity waning into the background and their eyes, noses and mouths–each once so defining a feature–are devolved into visual renditions of an uncertain recollection: ‘he had a long nose, thin lips, and his left eye hung lower than the other, with a heavy, drooping eyelid.’ In 1993, postmodernist philosopher Jacques Derrida devised the concept of ‘hauntology’–a term attempting to describe a state of being which cannot sit within our predefined temporal or ontological framework, represented by ‘the figure of the ghost as that which is neither present, nor absent, neither dead nor alive.' Fineman’s paintings can be said the be hauntological in a way. Memories are ghosts of events, unmarred and unaffected by time, with no physical embodiment; the act of attempting to create a visual representation of time or a memory belies their very nature. And so, instead, Fineman deftly creates works which cause us to consider time as a distinct entity–ghostly and omnipresent.

EMMA FINEMAN (b. 1991, Berkeley, California), lives and works in London, UK. In 2018 she graduated with an MA In Painting from Royal College of Art, London, and graduated Magna Cum Laude with a BFA in Painting from Maryland Institute College of Art in 2013. Solo exhibitions include: ‘Fin_Bow’, Eleven Spitalfields Gallery, London, UK (2017); ‘O.S 1’. The Great Highway Gallery, San Francisco, CA (2016); ‘Samgongur’, The Sub, San Francisco, CA (2015); and ‘Solo Booth’. White Space, Art Palm Beach, FL (2014). Selected group exhibitions include ‘John Moores Painting Prize Exhibition’, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, UK (2018); ‘Bloomberg New Contemporaries’. South London Gallery, London, UK (2018); ‘SURGE’, East Wing Biennial 13, Somerset House, London, UK (2018); and ‘RBA Rising Stars’. Framers Gallery, London, UK (2018). She has been included in publications such as Juxtapoz and ArtMaze.



 


Emma Fineman’s paintings (often oil on canvas) are, quite broadly, pictorial representations of time in contemporary culture. We live in a moment where our perspective of temporality is distorted, with instant mass communication of world events, and the rendering of images and memories within a digital space, creating a kind of cognitive dissonance–being at once near and distant. This inundation affects our ability to place events within existing frameworks of time and perspective. Fineman is interested in this speed of today’s culture, how it affects the genesis of new memories. It is this fractured sense of time (and the way that it is perceived) that Fineman attempts to interpret through gestural marks that, Fineman says: ‘sit somewhere between drawing and painting; between the quick note-to-self one makes in order to jot down an idea, and the more prolonged meditation on the parts of daily life that, for some unknowable reason, affix themselves to the back of one’s mind and kick about with an unnerving permanence.’ Fineman’s works certainly have a sense of both haste and permanence: bold, heavy marks seemingly being applied to the canvas with great speed–set down, perhaps, before the memory fades. In her representations of people, too, the artist renders faces and figures as if they were dwindling visages, a memory of a memory, their solidity waning into the background and their eyes, noses and mouths–each once so defining a feature–are devolved into visual renditions of an uncertain recollection: ‘he had a long nose, thin lips, and his left eye hung lower than the other, with a heavy, drooping eyelid.’ In 1993, postmodernist philosopher Jacques Derrida devised the concept of ‘hauntology’–a term attempting to describe a state of being which cannot sit within our predefined temporal or ontological framework, represented by ‘the figure of the ghost as that which is neither present, nor absent, neither dead nor alive.' Fineman’s paintings can be said the be hauntological in a way. Memories are ghosts of events, unmarred and unaffected by time, with no physical embodiment; the act of attempting to create a visual representation of time or a memory belies their very nature. And so, instead, Fineman deftly creates works which cause us to consider time as a distinct entity–ghostly and omnipresent.

EMMA FINEMAN (b. 1991, Berkeley, California), lives and works in London, UK. In 2018 she graduated with an MA In Painting from Royal College of Art, London, and graduated Magna Cum Laude with a BFA in Painting from Maryland Institute College of Art in 2013. Solo exhibitions include: ‘Fin_Bow’, Eleven Spitalfields Gallery, London, UK (2017); ‘O.S 1’. The Great Highway Gallery, San Francisco, CA (2016); ‘Samgongur’, The Sub, San Francisco, CA (2015); and ‘Solo Booth’. White Space, Art Palm Beach, FL (2014). Selected group exhibitions include ‘John Moores Painting Prize Exhibition’, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, UK (2018); ‘Bloomberg New Contemporaries’. South London Gallery, London, UK (2018); ‘SURGE’, East Wing Biennial 13, Somerset House, London, UK (2018); and ‘RBA Rising Stars’. Framers Gallery, London, UK (2018). She has been included in publications such as Juxtapoz and ArtMaze.