ATOI

Dale Adcock

Faig Ahmed

Hurvin Anderson

Scott Anderson

Fabio Lattanzi Antinori

Michael Armitage

Luke Armitstead

Lello // Arnell

Francis Bacon

Cornelia Baltes

Simon Belleau

Joshua Bilton

Alison Blickle

Benjamin Brett

Andrew Brischler

Carla Busuttil

Scott Carter

Jonathan Chapline

James Clarkson

Mikey Cook

Kevin Cooley

Elizabeth Corkery

Øystein Dahlstrøm

Blake Daniels

Fleur Van Dodewaard

Tomory Dodge

Antoine Donzeaud

Zavier Ellis

Amir Fattal

Madeline Von Forerster

Ruth Freeman

Anthony Goicolea

Jonny Green

Pablo Griss

Eckart Hahn

Felicity Hammond

Byzantia Harlow

Neil Harrison

Clinton Hayden

Colleen Heslin

Oliver Hickmet

Aaron Holz

Edward Hopley

Gary Hume

Christoffer Joergensen

Tamara K.E

Olivier Kosta-Thefaine

Olaf Kuhnemann

Bruce LaBruce

Janneke Van Leeuwen

Tomáš Libertíny

Gijs Van Lith

Tom Lovelace

Kate Lyddon

Nigel Massey

Roberto & Renato Miaz

Holly Mills

Jenny Morgan

Ryan Mosley

Benjamin Murphy

Jose Carlos Naranjo

Regina Nieke

Sarah Pager

Selma Parlour

Yelena Popova

Martine Poppe

Tony Romano

Lou Ros

Maja Ruznic

Alan Sastre

Sebastian Schrader

Andrew Sendor

Dominic Shepherd

Pawel Sliwinski

Berndnaut Smilde

Evren Sungur

Shaan Syed

Struan Teague

Alexander Tinei

Kristian Touborg

Luke Turner

Alain Urrutia

Dan Voinea

Mathew Weir

Jack West

Jonathan Zawada

Andrew Salgado

Inquire about this work

The Astrology Lesson (2019), Oil and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 210x165cm (framed)
The Dandy (2019), Oil and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 210x165cm
Contemporary Pleasure Island Time Wasters (2019), Oil and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 210x165cm (framed)
Lost By The Sea (2018), Oil and Pastel on Canvas, 195x185cm
Horizon (For Gord Downie) (2018), Oil and Oil Pastel on Linen, 200x155cm
CAMARGUE (Les-Saintes-Maries-De-La-Mer) (2018), oil and pastel on linen, 91x80cm
Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (2018), oil and oil pastel on linen, 79x59cm
Picture Window (2018), Oil and Oil Pastel on Linen, 200x155cm



Andrew Salgado’s paintings have evolved greatly in style since first rising to prominence over half a decade ago with his (then) signature large-scale, painterly portraits, where large swathes of colour played across the surface to define his subjects. In his most recent work - the representational has given way to the more abstract: and now such colourful, symbolic, and compositional elements are the driving force of the painted image. While the figures remains a common thread –today Salgado’s subjects are depicted in a fantastical, often ominous tableaux: a harlequin-like figure (perhaps referencing Picasso) walks amid an indefinable horizon, followed by a silhouetted figure under a heavy moon; an unrecognisable figure sits atop a horse both still before the viewer; a man before a picture window, partially obscured by a field of flowers, gazes wistfully into the distance.

There are abundant references to the tradition of figurative painting both historic and contemporary: Matisse, Gauguin, and Bacon are all readily recalled; while contemporary greats like Tal R, Daniel Richter, and Peter Doig are also referenced with equal reverie and respect – often like quiet in-jokes for a viewer to catch. Salgado’s most recent works reference the very act of painting with the artist’s wry sense of humor and self-awareness: Contemporary Pleasure Island Time Wasters pulls its title from (the ‘Before and After’ category of the) popular gameshow Jeopardy! – suggesting the artist’s desire to shirk authobiography for the non-sequitur and playful. The artist’s long-standing tendency to paint clowns and the absurd remain constant (in 2016’s The Fool Makes a Joke at Midnight, the artist had actual circus performers in the exhibition space during the exhibition’s duration), and again one sees faces are painted in bright orange, with purple noses and vibrantly coloured hair. Where there once was a plain background, which placed the figure at the forefront of the image, now there is a kind of harmonious cacophony, a medley of pop-coloured squiggles, harlequin patterns, and wonky block shapes–all of which may seem hastily scribbled if it weren’t for the fact that they slot into one another like an impossibly orchestrated puzzle.

As a result, it could be said that Salgado’s more recent works are altogether less serious – or certainly more irreverent - than his previous offerings. They are brighter, more celebratory, even theatrical. The artist carries this sense of play into his exhibitions, too. For ‘The Snake’ (BEERS London, 2016), hundreds of butterflies were released to flutter amongst the audience as if they had burst from the artworks themselves; ‘A Room with a View of the Ocean’ (Lauba House, 2017) saw an 8-metre ocean projection (and artificial ‘beach’) on the final room’s wall, inviting the audience to partake in a meditation of what they had seen; and the two-day exhibition ‘Nature Boy’ (BEERS London, 2018) saw a pianist (at a baby-grand!) playing the eponymous song on repeat for the entirety of the show’s duration. For Salgado, similar to his increasing use of collaged elements, an exhibition is an opportunity to extend elements of the painting beyond the canvas–an invitation into his world of colour, fantasy, and fun.

ANDREW SALGADO (b. 1982, Regina, Canada) lives and works in London, England. He graduated with an MA in Fine Art from Chelsea College of Art and Design in 2009, and a BFA from University of BC, Vancouver, in 2005. Salgado has had 13 sold-out solo exhibitions, and in 2017, was the youngest artist to ever receive a survey-exhibition at The Canadian High Commission in London, accompanied by a 300-page monograph, both of which were entitled TEN. In 2013 he was thrust into the spotlight having been commissioned by Harvey Nichols to do 6 paintings for their storefront display. Previous solo exhibitions include, 'Blue Rainbow' Angell Gallery, Toronto, (October 2018); 'Nature Boy', Beers London, (2018); 'Dirty Linen & The Nihilist's Alphabet, Christopher Moller Gallery, Cape Town (2018), ‘A Room with a View of the Ocean’, Lauba Art House, Zagreb (2017); ‘TEN’, Gallery of the Canadian High Commission, London (2017); and ‘The Fool Makes a Joke at Midnight’, Thierry Goldberg, New York (2016). His fourth solo show at Beers London is currently scheduled for 1st quarter, 2020. In 2015, Salgado curated The Fantasy of Representation, including work by Francis Bacon, Gary Hume, and Hurvin Anderson, including an impassioned manifesto on representational painting. He has received extensive press both online and in print, including GQ, The Evening Standard, The Independent, Artsy, METRO, Attitude Magazine, Globe and Mail (CAN) and Macleans (CAN). He frequently donates to charities including Pride London, Stonewall, and Diversity Role Models; his donations to the Terrence Higgins Trust are of particular note, having have raised over six-figures. In March 2019, he successfully entered the secondary market with a piece in a Strauss & Co Auction in South Africa. 



 




Andrew Salgado’s paintings have evolved greatly in style since first rising to prominence over half a decade ago with his (then) signature large-scale, painterly portraits, where large swathes of colour played across the surface to define his subjects. In his most recent work - the representational has given way to the more abstract: and now such colourful, symbolic, and compositional elements are the driving force of the painted image. While the figures remains a common thread –today Salgado’s subjects are depicted in a fantastical, often ominous tableaux: a harlequin-like figure (perhaps referencing Picasso) walks amid an indefinable horizon, followed by a silhouetted figure under a heavy moon; an unrecognisable figure sits atop a horse both still before the viewer; a man before a picture window, partially obscured by a field of flowers, gazes wistfully into the distance.

There are abundant references to the tradition of figurative painting both historic and contemporary: Matisse, Gauguin, and Bacon are all readily recalled; while contemporary greats like Tal R, Daniel Richter, and Peter Doig are also referenced with equal reverie and respect – often like quiet in-jokes for a viewer to catch. Salgado’s most recent works reference the very act of painting with the artist’s wry sense of humor and self-awareness: Contemporary Pleasure Island Time Wasters pulls its title from (the ‘Before and After’ category of the) popular gameshow Jeopardy! – suggesting the artist’s desire to shirk authobiography for the non-sequitur and playful. The artist’s long-standing tendency to paint clowns and the absurd remain constant (in 2016’s The Fool Makes a Joke at Midnight, the artist had actual circus performers in the exhibition space during the exhibition’s duration), and again one sees faces are painted in bright orange, with purple noses and vibrantly coloured hair. Where there once was a plain background, which placed the figure at the forefront of the image, now there is a kind of harmonious cacophony, a medley of pop-coloured squiggles, harlequin patterns, and wonky block shapes–all of which may seem hastily scribbled if it weren’t for the fact that they slot into one another like an impossibly orchestrated puzzle.

As a result, it could be said that Salgado’s more recent works are altogether less serious – or certainly more irreverent - than his previous offerings. They are brighter, more celebratory, even theatrical. The artist carries this sense of play into his exhibitions, too. For ‘The Snake’ (BEERS London, 2016), hundreds of butterflies were released to flutter amongst the audience as if they had burst from the artworks themselves; ‘A Room with a View of the Ocean’ (Lauba House, 2017) saw an 8-metre ocean projection (and artificial ‘beach’) on the final room’s wall, inviting the audience to partake in a meditation of what they had seen; and the two-day exhibition ‘Nature Boy’ (BEERS London, 2018) saw a pianist (at a baby-grand!) playing the eponymous song on repeat for the entirety of the show’s duration. For Salgado, similar to his increasing use of collaged elements, an exhibition is an opportunity to extend elements of the painting beyond the canvas–an invitation into his world of colour, fantasy, and fun.

ANDREW SALGADO (b. 1982, Regina, Canada) lives and works in London, England. He graduated with an MA in Fine Art from Chelsea College of Art and Design in 2009, and a BFA from University of BC, Vancouver, in 2005. Salgado has had 13 sold-out solo exhibitions, and in 2017, was the youngest artist to ever receive a survey-exhibition at The Canadian High Commission in London, accompanied by a 300-page monograph, both of which were entitled TEN. In 2013 he was thrust into the spotlight having been commissioned by Harvey Nichols to do 6 paintings for their storefront display. Previous solo exhibitions include, 'Blue Rainbow' Angell Gallery, Toronto, (October 2018); 'Nature Boy', Beers London, (2018); 'Dirty Linen & The Nihilist's Alphabet, Christopher Moller Gallery, Cape Town (2018), ‘A Room with a View of the Ocean’, Lauba Art House, Zagreb (2017); ‘TEN’, Gallery of the Canadian High Commission, London (2017); and ‘The Fool Makes a Joke at Midnight’, Thierry Goldberg, New York (2016). His fourth solo show at Beers London is currently scheduled for 1st quarter, 2020. In 2015, Salgado curated The Fantasy of Representation, including work by Francis Bacon, Gary Hume, and Hurvin Anderson, including an impassioned manifesto on representational painting. He has received extensive press both online and in print, including GQ, The Evening Standard, The Independent, Artsy, METRO, Attitude Magazine, Globe and Mail (CAN) and Macleans (CAN). He frequently donates to charities including Pride London, Stonewall, and Diversity Role Models; his donations to the Terrence Higgins Trust are of particular note, having have raised over six-figures. In March 2019, he successfully entered the secondary market with a piece in a Strauss & Co Auction in South Africa.